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Good Twitter Samaritans accidentally prevent shoeshine scam

A few days ago, Indian news portals were buzzing with tales of a well-worn shoeshine scam making its way into social media. It’s a great example of how good-natured gestures can unwittingly aid scammers when we combine high-visibility accounts with potential lack of fact checking. Thankfully, it comes with a happy ending for a change. What happened? A Twitter user dragged this offline scam into … [Read more...]

Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 investigation shows Russian disinformation campaigns have global reach

A little background: on July 17, 2014, Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot from the sky on its way from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur above the Ukraine. The plane was hit by a surface-to-air missile, and as a result, all 298 people on board were killed. At that time, there was a revolt of pro-Russian militants against the Ukrainian government. Both the Ukrainian military and the separatists … [Read more...]

Cooperating apps and automatic permissions are setting you up for failure

“Hey you. Someone from HR has invited you to a meeting on Thursday. Would you like me to add the appointment to the calendar?” Receiving an email notification when someone has invited you to a meeting is a feature that many professionals would not like to miss. Being able to log in at certain sites with your Facebook profile might be less indispensable, but nevertheless, it’s a heavily-used … [Read more...]

A week in security (June 17 – 23)

Last week on the Malwarebytes Labs blog, we took a look at the growing pains of smart cities, took a deep dive into AI, jammed along to Radiohead, and looked at the lessons learned from Chernobyl in relation to critical infrastructure. We also explored a new Steam phish attack, and pulled apart a Mac cryptominer. Other cybersecurity news Florida City falls to ransomware: Riviera Beach City … [Read more...]

NIST’s privacy framework lets privacy tell its own story

Online privacy remains unsolved. Congress prods at it, some companies fumble with it (while a small handful excel), and the public demands it. But one government agency is trying to bring everyone together to fix it. As the Senate sits on no fewer than four data privacy bills that their own members wrote—with no plans to vote on any—and as the world’s largest social media company braces for an … [Read more...]

Governments increasingly eye social media meltdown

These are trying times for social networks, with endless reports of harassment and abuse not being tackled and many users leaving platforms forever. The major sites such as Facebook and Twitter do what they can, but sheer userbase volume and erroneous automated feedback leave people cold. Bugs such as potentially sharing location data when users enable it alongside other accounts on the same phone … [Read more...]

The top six takeaways for user privacy

Last week, Malwarebytes Labs began closing out our data privacy and cybersecurity law blog series, a two-month long exploration spanning five continents, 50 states, just as many data breach notification laws, three non-universal definitions of personal information and personal data, five pending US data protection laws, and one hypothetical startup’s efforts to just make sense of it all. We … [Read more...]

A week in security (February 25 – March 3)

Last week, we delved into the realm of K-12 schools and security, explored the world of compromised websites and Golang bruteforcers, and examined the possible realms of pay for privacy. We also looked at identity management solutions, Google’s Universal Read Gadget, and did the deepest of dives into the life of Max Schrems. Other security news Big coin, big  problems: Founder of My Big Coin … [Read more...]

Will pay-for-privacy be the new normal?

Privacy is a human right, and online privacy should be no exception. Yet, as the US considers new laws to protect individuals’ online data, at least two proposals—one statewide law that can still be amended and one federal draft bill that has yet to be introduced—include an unwelcome bargain: exchanging money for privacy. This framework, sometimes called “pay-for-privacy,” is plain wrong. It casts … [Read more...]

Should you delete yourself from social media?

You’re feeling like you’ve had enough. All the recent news—from Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica snafu to various abuses of Twitter vulnerabilities—has you wondering: Should I delete myself from social media? Social networking does have its positive aspects. You can stay in touch with distant (or not) relatives, be included in the planning of social events within your circle of … [Read more...]