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A week in security (January 18 – January 24)

Last week on Malwarebytes Labs, we looked at changes to WhatsApp’s privacy policy, we provided information about Malwarebytes being targeted by the same threat actor that was implicated in the SolarWinds breach, we told the story of ZeroLogon, looked at the pros and cons of Zoom watermarking, studied the vulnerabilities in dnsmasq called DNSpooq, asked if TikTok’s new settings are enough to keep … [Read more...]

Chrome wants to make your passwords stronger

A common sentiment, shared by many people down the years, is that storing passwords in browsers is a bad idea. Malware, for example, would specifically target password storage in browsers and plunder everything in sight. Password managers weren’t exactly flying off the shelves back in 2007, your only real options were home grown. People ended up saving logins in all sorts of odd places: Text … [Read more...]

Ubiquiti breach, and other IoT security problems

Networking equipment manufacturer Ubiquiti sent out an email to warn users about a possible data breach. The email stated there had been unauthorized access to its IT systems that are hosted with a third-party cloud provider. Ubiquiti Networks sells networking devices and IoT devices. It did not specify which products were affected but pointed at UI.com, which is its customer web portal. The … [Read more...]

A week in security (June 22 – 28)

Last week on Malwarebytes Labs, we provided a zero-day guide for 2020 featuring recent attacks and advanced preventive techniques, and we learned how to cough in the face of scammers, offering security tips for the 2020 tax season. We also looked at a web skimmer hiding within EXIF metadata that was exfiltrating credit cards via image files. In the most recent episode of our podcast Lock and … [Read more...]

The passwordless present: Will biometrics replace passwords forever?

When it comes to securing your sensitive, personally identifiable information against criminals who can engineer countless ways to snatch it from under your nose, experts have long recommended the use of strong, complex passwords. Using long passphrases with combinations of numbers, letters, and symbols that cannot be easily guessed has been the de facto security guidance for more than 20 years. … [Read more...]

Cybersecurity labeling scheme introduced to help users choose safe IoT devices

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a term used to describe a wide variety of devices that are connected to the Internet to improve user experience. For example, a doorbell becomes part of the IoT when it connects to the Internet and allows users to see visitors outside their door. But the way in which some of these IoT devices connect invites serious security and privacy concerns. This has led to … [Read more...]

A week in security (December 23 – 29)

Last week on Malwarebytes Labs, we continued our retrospective coverage with a look at how lawmakers in the United States treated online privacy this year, finding trends in multiple federal bills introduced in the Senate. Then we took a little break for the holidays. Other cybersecurity news: Now an annual tradition for close to a decade, SplashData unveiled this year’s most popular … [Read more...]

Fake Elder Scrolls Online developers go phishing on PlayStation

A player of popular gaming title Elder Scrolls Online recently took to Reddit to warn users of a phish via Playstation messaging. This particular phishing attempt is notable for ramping up the pressure on recipients—a classic social engineering technique taken to the extreme. A terms of service violation? In MMORPG land, the scammers take a theoretically plausible deadline, crunch it into … [Read more...]

New version of IcedID Trojan uses steganographic payloads

This blog post was authored by @hasherezade, with contributions from @siri_urz and Jérôme Segura. Security firm Proofpoint recently published a report about a series of malspam campaigns they attribute to a threat actor called TA2101. Originally targeting German and Italian users with Cobalt Strike and Maze ransomware, the later wave of malicious emails were aimed at the US and pushing the … [Read more...]

IoT bills and guidelines: a global response

You may not have noticed, but Internet of Things (IoT) rules and regulations are coming whether manufacturers want them or not. From experience, drafting up laws which are (hopefully) sensible and have some relevance to problems raised by current technology is a time-consuming, frustrating process. However, it’s not that long since we saw IoT devices go mainstream—right into people’s homes, … [Read more...]