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A week in security (May 6 – 12)

Last week on Labs, we discussed what to do when you discover a data breach, how 5G could impact cybersecurity strategy, the top six takeaways for user privacy, vulnerabilities in financial mobile apps that put consumers and businesses at risk, and in our series about vital infrastructure, we highlighted threats that target financial institutions, fintech, and cryptocurrencies. Other … [Read more...]

A week in security (April 29 – May 5)

Last week on Labs we discussed the possible exit scam of dark net market Wall Street Market, how the Electrum DDoS botnet reaches 152,000 infected hosts, we looked at the sophisticated threats plague ailing healthcare industry, a mysterious database that exposed personal information of 80 million US households, how Mozilla urges Apple to make privacy a team sport, the state of cryptojacking in the … [Read more...]

The top six takeaways for corporate data privacy compliance

For nearly two months, Malwarebytes Labs has led readers on a journey through data privacy laws around the world, exploring the nuances between “personal information” and “personal data,” as well as between data breach notification laws in Florida, Utah, California, and Iowa. We explored the risks of jumping into the global data privacy game, comparing the European Union’s laws with the laws … [Read more...]

Mozilla urges Apple to make privacy a team sport

We often say cybersecurity is a team sport, but, pending a public advocacy campaign from one major tech developer to another, the same might be true for online privacy. Mozilla is currently getting people around the world to lend their voices toward Apple, asking that the company place some extra barriers between iPhone users and online advertisers. Though cybersecurity researchers disagree … [Read more...]

Consumers have few legal options for protecting privacy

There are no promises in the words, “We care about user privacy.” Yet, these words appear on privacy policy after privacy policy, serving as disingenuous banners to hide potentially invasive corporate practices, including clandestine data collection, sharing, and selling. This is no accident. It is a strategy. In the US, companies that break their own privacy policies can—and do—face … [Read more...]