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Labs Cybercrime Tactics and Techniques report finds businesses hit with 235 percent more threats in Q1

The Malwarebytes Labs Cybercrime Tactics and Techniques Q1 2019 report found businesses at the butt end of a bad joke. In just one year, threats aimed at corporate targets have increased by 235 percent, with Trojans, such as Emotet, and ransomware in particular revving up in the first quarter. Included in the report is analysis of sharp declines in consumer cryptomining and other threats, … [Read more...]

“Funky malware format” found in Ocean Lotus sample

Recently, at the SAS conference I talked about “Funky malware formats”—atypical executable formats used by malware that are only loaded by proprietary loaders. Malware authors use them in order to make static detection more difficult, because custom formats are not recognized as executable by AV scanners. Using atypical formats may also slow down the analysis process because the … [Read more...]

Was this really an attempt by the Chinese?

Last weekend, during President Trump’s visit to the Mar-a-Lago resort, a 23-year-old Chinese woman attempted to gain access to the Florida resort by lying and bluffing her way in. After some discussion at the gate, she was escorted to the reception of the resort where it was found out that she was not on the list of people that were allowed to enter. According to the report a search of her … [Read more...]

A week in security (March 25 – 31)

Last week, we looked at plugin vulnerabilities, location tracking app problems, and talked about plain text password woes. We also looked at federal data privacy regulation and took a deep dive into  BatMobi Adware. Other cybersecurity news Poisoned software update headache for ASUS (Source: The Register) Britain’s Huawei oversight board releases its findings (Source: UK.GOV) Trojanised terror … [Read more...]

Norsk Hydro hit by “severe” cyber attack

Aluminium manufacturing giant Norsk Hydro was forced to switch to manual operations following a “severe” ransomware attack on Monday, 18 March.  The Norway-based company, which employs more than 35,000 people in 40 countries, was reportedly hit with ransomware known as LockerGoga.  Several of its plants around the world … [Read more...]

Emotet revisited: pervasive threat still a danger to businesses

One of the most common and pervasive threats for businesses today is Emotet, a banking Trojan turned downloader that has been on our list of top 10 detections for many months in a row. Emotet, which Malwarebytes detects as Trojan.Emotet, has been leveled at consumers and organizations across the globe, fooling users into infecting endpoints through phishing emails, and then spreading laterally … [Read more...]

Spotlight on Troldesh ransomware, aka ‘Shade’

Despite the decline in the number of ransomware infections over the last year, there are several ransomware families that are still active. Ransom.Troldesh, aka Shade, is one of them. According to our product telemetry, Shade has experienced a sharp increase in detections from Q4 2018 to Q1 2019. When we see a swift spike in detections of a malware family, that tells us we’re in the middle of an … [Read more...]

A week in security (January 28 – February 3)

Last week, we ran another in our interview with a malware hunter series, explained a FaceTime vulnerability, and took a deep dive into a new stealer. We also threw some light  on a Houzz data breach, and what exactly happened between Apple and Facebook. Other cybersecurity news Kwik Fit hit by malware: Car service specialist runs into trouble when systems go offline. (Source: BBC) Mozilla … [Read more...]

Analyzing a new stealer written in Golang

Golang (Go) is a relatively new programming language, and it is not common to find malware written in it. However, new variants written in Go are slowly emerging, presenting a challenge to malware analysts. Applications written in this language are bulky and look much different under a debugger from those that are compiled in other languages, such as C/C++. Recently, a new variant of Zebocry … [Read more...]

Hosting malicious sites on legitimate servers: How do threat actors get away with it?

How do threat actors manage to get their sites and files hosted on legitimate providers’ servers? I have asked myself this question many times, and many times thought, “The threat actors pay for it, and for some companies, money is all that matters.” But is it really that simple? I decided to find out. I asked some companies, as well as some of my co-workers who are involved with site takedowns on … [Read more...]