dcsimg

Malsmoke operators abandon exploit kits in favor of social engineering scheme

Exploit kits continue to be used as a malware delivery platform. In 2020, we’ve observed a number of different malvertising campaigns leading to RIG, Fallout, Spelevo and Purple Fox, among others. And, in September, we put out a blog post detailing a surge in malvertising via adult websites. One of those campaigns we dubbed ‘malsmoke’ had been active since the beginning of … [Read more...]

Taurus Project stealer now spreading via malvertising campaign

For the past several months, Taurus Project—a relatively new stealer that appeared in the spring of 2020—has been distributed via malspam campaigns targeting users in the United States. The macro-laced documents spawn a PowerShell script that invokes certutil to run an autoit script ultimately responsible for downloading the Taurus binary. Taurus was originally built as a fork by the developer … [Read more...]

Malvertising campaigns come back in full swing

Malvertising campaigns leading to exploit kits are nowhere near as common these days. Indeed, a number of threat actors have moved on to other delivery methods instead of relying on drive-by downloads. However, occasionally we see spikes in activity that are noticeable enough that they highlight a successful run. In late August, we started seeing a Fallout exploit kit campaign distributing the … [Read more...]

Copycat criminals abuse Malwarebytes brand in malvertising campaign

While exploit kit activity has been fairly quiet for some time now, we recently discovered a threat actor creating a copycat—fake—Malwarebytes website that was used as a gate to the Fallout EK, which distributes the Raccoon stealer. The few malvertising campaigns that remain are often found on second- and third-tier adult sites, leading to the Fallout or RIG exploit kits, as a majority of … [Read more...]

A week in security (November 18 – 24)

Last week on Malwarebytes Labs, we looked at stalkerware’s legal enforcement problem, announced our cooperation with other security vendors and advocacy groups to launch Coalition Against Stalkerware, published our fall 2019 review of exploit kits, looked at how Deepfake on LinkedIn makes for malign interference campaigns, rounded up our knowledge about the Disney+ security and service issues, … [Read more...]

Pulse VPN patched their vulnerability, but businesses are trailing behind

In April 2019, Pulse Secure published an advisory about a vulnerability in their software. In August, cybercriminals were massively scanning for systems that were running a vulnerable version. Now it’s October, and still many organizations have not applied the patches that are available for this vulnerability. This is a trend we’ve seen repeated with dozens of other publicly-known … [Read more...]

Five years later, Heartbleed vulnerability still unpatched

The Heartbleed vulnerability was introduced into the OpenSSL crypto library in 2012. It was discovered and fixed in 2014, yet today—five years later—there are still unpatched systems.  This article will provide IT teams with the necessary information to decide whether or not to apply the Heartbleed vulnerability fix. However, we caution: The latter could leave your users’ data exposed to future … [Read more...]

The Hidden Bee infection chain, part 1: the stegano pack

About a year ago, we described the Hidden Bee miner delivered by the Underminer Exploit Kit. Hidden Bee has a complex and multi-layered internal structure that is unusual among cybercrime toolkits, making it an interesting phenomenon on the threat landscape. That’s why we’re dedicating a series of posts to exploring particular elements and updates made during one year of its … [Read more...]

A week in security (July 29 – August 4)

Last week on Malwarebytes Labs we discussed the security and privacy changes in Android Q, how to get your Equifax money and stay safe doing it, and we looked at the strategy of getting a board of directors to invest in government cybersecurity. We also reviewed how a Capital One breach exposed over 100 million credit card applications, analyzed the exploit kit activity in the summer of 2019, and … [Read more...]

Exploit kits: summer 2019 review

In the months since our last spring review, there has been some interesting activity from several exploit kits. While the playing field remains essentially the same with Internet Explorer and Flash Player as the most-commonly-exploited, it is undeniable that there has been a marked effort from exploit kit authors to add some rather cool tricks to their arsenal. For example, several exploit kits … [Read more...]