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Flaw in Twitter form may have been abused by nation states

Twitter announced in a blog post on Monday that they discovered and addressed a security flaw on one of their support forms. The discovery was made on November 15 — more than a month ago — and was promptly fixed the next day. From the Twitter blog on this issue: We have become aware of an issue related to one of our support forms, which is used by account holders to contact Twitter about issues … [Read more...]

The 25th anniversary of the webcam: What did it bring us?

How did the webcam progress from a simple convenience to a worldwide security concern in 25 years? November 2018 can be marked as the 25th anniversary of the webcam. This is a bit of an arbitrary choice, but if we consider a webcam that was installed at the University of Cambridge to keep an eye on the coffee level in the shared coffeemaker as the first one, then it’s been 25 years already. And … [Read more...]

A week in security (August 6 – 12)

Last week, we published a review of exploit kits, talked about everyday tech that can give you a headache, and showed how to protect RDP access from ransomware. We also published a study on the true cost of cybercrime. Other news: Discovered at Black Hat: WhatsApp “message manipulation” (Source: The Register) Discovered at Black Hat: AI attacks (Source: The Register) Once again, … [Read more...]

Trojans: What’s the real deal?

The fictional Greeks hiding in their legendary Trojan horse would probably be excited to learn that the default Wiki page for Trojan is, in fact, their big wooden horse thingy (vs. computer infections or dubious businesses). Sorry, fictional ancient Greek warriors. It’s not that we don’t think you’re a big deal—that film with Brad Pitt was at least a 6 out of 10. It’s just that at this … [Read more...]

A week in security (June 4 – June 10)

Last week on Labs, we took a look at hidden mobile ads, the perils of social media spam, and how to shore up your landline defenses. We also took a deep dive into Emotet malware analysis, and gave you some summertime safety tips. Other news Update your Adobe Flash player if you haven’t already. (source: Adobe) Be careful with your World Cup Wi-Fi. (Source: Securelist) Wannacry ransomware … [Read more...]

Internet Shortcut used in Necurs malspam campaign

The Necurs botnet continues to be one of the most prolific malicious spam distributors, with regular waves of carefully-crafted attachments that are used to download malware. The majority of malspam campaigns that we track are targeting Microsoft Office with documents containing either macros or exploits. We also see a number of other types of malicious attachments that are zipped scripts (.VBS, … [Read more...]

Avzhan DDoS bot dropped by Chinese drive-by attack

The Avzhan DDoS bot has been known since 2010, but recently we saw it in wild again, being dropped by a Chinese drive-by attack. In this post, we’ll take a deep dive into its functionality and compare the sample we captured with the one described in the past. Analyzed sample 05749f08ebd9762511c6da92481e87d8 – The main sample, dropped by the exploit … [Read more...]

A state of constant uncertainty or uncertain constancy? Fast flux explained

Last August, WireX made headlines. For one thing, it was dubbed the first-known DDoS botnet that used the Android platform. For another, it used a technique that—for those who have been around in the industry for quite a while now—rung familiar in the ears: fast flux. In the context of cybersecurity, fast flux could refer to two things: one, a network similar to a P2P that hosts a botnet’s … [Read more...]