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A week in security (July 29 – August 4)

Last week on Malwarebytes Labs we discussed the security and privacy changes in Android Q, how to get your Equifax money and stay safe doing it, and we looked at the strategy of getting a board of directors to invest in government cybersecurity. We also reviewed how a Capital One breach exposed over 100 million credit card applications, analyzed the exploit kit activity in the summer of 2019, and … [Read more...]

Everything you need to know about ATM attacks and fraud: part 2

This is the second and final installment of our two-part series on automated teller machine (ATM) attacks and fraud. In part 1, we identified the reasons why ATMs are vulnerable—from inherent weaknesses of its frame to its software—and delved deep into two of the four kinds of attacks against them: terminal tampering and physical attacks. Terminal tampering has many types, but it involves … [Read more...]

A week in security (June 24 – 30)

Last week on Malwarebytes Labs, we peeled back the mystery on an elusive malware campaign that relied on blank JavaScript injections, detailed for readers our latest telemetry on the tricky GreenFlash Sundown exploit, and looked at one of the top campaigns directing traffic toward scareware pages for Microsoft’s Azure Cloud Services. We also doubled down on our commitment—and significantly … [Read more...]

A week in security (May 27 – June 2)

Last week on Malwarebytes Labs, we took readers through a deep dive—way down the rabbit hole—into the novel malware called “Hidden Bee.” We also looked at the potential impact of a government agency’s privacy framework, and delivered to readers everything they needed to know about ATM attacks and fraud. Lastly, amidst continuing news about the City of Baltimore suffering a ransomware attack, we … [Read more...]

Everything you need to know about ATM attacks and fraud: Part 1

Flashback to two years ago. At exactly 12:33 a.m., a solitary ATM somewhere in Taichung City, Taiwan, spewed out 90,000 TWD (New Taiwan Dollar)—about US$2,900 today—in bank notes. No one was cashing out money from the ATM at the time. In fact, this seemingly odd system glitch was actually a test: The culprit who successfully infiltrated one of First Commercial Bank’s London branch servers … [Read more...]